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China refined tea processing industry

China refined tea processing industry

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China refined tea processing Industry 2009
China refined tea processing Industry, 2009 is valuable for anyone who wants to invest in the refined tea processing industry, to get Chinese investments; to import into China or export from China, to build factories and take advantage of lower costs in China, to partner with one of the key Chinese corporations, to get market shares as China is boosting its domestic needs; to forecast the future of the world economy as China is leading the way; or to compete in the segment. The report provides in-depth analysis and detailed insight into the refined tea processing industry, market drivers, key enterprises and their strategies, as well as technologies and investment status, risks and trends. ( http://www.bharatbook.com/Market-Research-Reports/China-refined-tea-processing-industry.html )
Data sources: Governmental statistics organizations, market research (monitoring) centers, industry associations and institutions, import and export statistics organizations, and others.
This report is divided into 9 parts 19 chapters as follow:
Part 1 Industry Overview
1 Industry definition and development overview
2 Industry macroscopic environment and its influence analysis
3 Industry international market analysis
4 Industry domestic market analysis
Part 2 Basic indices
5 Analysis of the industry’s scale and condition: 2004-2008
6 Status analysis of gross assets analysis: 2004-2008
Part 3 Economic operation
7 Analysis of gross industrial output: 2004-2008
8 Industry sales income analysis: 2004-2008
9 Industry gross profit analysis
10 Industry import/export analysis in 2008
Part 4 Competition landscape
11 Industry competition landscape analysis
12 Industry key enterprises’ competitive power comparison (top 20)
Part 5 Key enterprises
13 Comparative analysis of the economic indicators of the industry’s key enterprises
Part 6 Business strategy
14. Development bottlenecks and coping strategies in Industry
15 Enterprise development strategy analysis and recommendations in Industry
Part 7 Market investment
16 Comparison and analysis of investment activity coefficient and rate of return on investment in Industry
17 Industry investment environment and risks analysis
Part 8 Technology
18 Status and trends of the newest technology applications in Industry
Part 9 Developments and trends
19 Development trends and operation capacity forecast for 2009-2013

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Chinese tea – oolong tea brewing

Chinese Tea – Oolong Tea Brewing

Chinese tea Brewing Instructions

There are four main methods of steeping tea, two conventional and two traditional. Since I’m only referring to Chinese loose leaf teas, the principles behind all these methods need a bit of further explaining for those crossing the bridge from tea bags to fine loose teas. Remember, tea is still always a matter of letting leaves sit in water and then enjoying, so don’t be put off by all the methods written below for making a cup of Chinese tea – It’s still a cup of tea!

The first principle of tea steeping to remember is that the few leaves/pieces/bits/rolls of tea that you start with can be used to produce dozens of rounds of tea. How many rounds is dependent on the type of tea and often the quality as well. Each time you brew one round of tea, it is called an ‘infusion’. Once the liquid is removed or ‘decanted’ it can again be used with more hot water and ‘reinfused’; creating another infusion. All of these main tea methods exist as ways for infusing tea, decanting, and then pouring into cups. The idea is to preserve the leaves while you drink the tea to allow them to resist further infusions and continue to properly let out flavor. For example, if you are planning on drinking tea alone and make a whole pot for yourself, without decanting the pot of tea, the leaves will let out their entire flavor into the first infusion while you drink your first cup! That isn’t to say that decanting is 100% necessary, just as long as you have enough tea drinkers to empty a pot.

How Oolong Tea is produced

Manual production method supported by tradition and craftsmanship.
The production of delicious oolong tea requires time-honored tradition and outstanding craftsmanship. Tea leaves are picked on the morning of a clear day. They should be picked in units consisting of one bud and three leaves and exposed to the sun. This is the first stage. The second stage is to dry them indoors to promote fermentation. The most crucial part in the production of oolong tea is when to stop fermentation. As oolong tea is fermented to some extent, it is called semi-fermented tea. Experience is required to identify the best time to stop the fermentation, which is when the leaves are 30% red and 70% green. After this, they are rubbed repeatedly to generate good flavor, aroma, and texture. Then they are dried using charcoal. At the final stage, a tea master grades the quality according to the flavor and characteristics of each batch. China’s Fujian Chaye Jin Chukou Gongsi (Tea Import and Export Corporation and Fujian Tea Association) exports oolong tea to Japan.

Flow of Production Stages (China)
– Tea leaves are picked by hand in units of one bud and three leaves
– First fermentation
– 30% red and 70% green
– Careful decision on when to stop fermentation
– Generation of the qualities unique to oolong tea
– Charcoal drying
– Grading by a tea master
– Export to Japan

In China, tea has historically been used as a medicine. Many studies have been carried out up to the present day about the effects of tea. It has been known for some time that tea helps to control obesity and this is common knowledge in China. A Chinese classical pharmaceutical book called the Bencao Shiyi (The Compendium of Materia Medica) states, “Drinking Chinese tea for a long time will make one live long to stay in good shape without becoming too fat and too heavy.”

A cup of tea in the morning sets the pace of the day. Sitting and chatting with a few good friends over a couple rounds of tea makes life worth living. Brewing Chinese tea calms me down.Chinese tea is more than just something to drink. It has in fact become a way of life for many.

Chinese tea production

Chinese tea production

The history of tea in china can be traced back to Three Thousand years ago. Tea had been used for the “Offer Sacrifices” to Gods or the ancestors.

A new Chinese tea plant must grow for five years before its leaves can be picked and, at 30 years of age, it will be too old to be productive. The trunk of the old plant must then be cut off to force new stems to grow out of the roots in the coming year. By repeated rehabilitation in this way, a plant may serve for about l00 years .

For the fertilization of tea gardens, Soya-bean cakes or other varieties of organic manure are generally used, and seldom chemical fertilizers. When pests are discovered, the affected plants will be removed to prevent their spread, and also to avoid the use of pesticides.

The season of Chinese tea picking depends on local climate and varies from area to area. On the shores of West Lake in Hangzhou, where the famous green tea Longjing (Dragon Well) comes from, picking starts from the end of March and lasts through October, altogether 20-30 times from the same plants at intervals of seven to ten days. With a longer interval, the quality of the tea will deteriorate.

The new leaves must be parched in Chinese tea cauldrons. This work , which used to be done manually, has been largely mechanized. Top-grade Dragon Well tea, however, still has to be stir-parched by hand, doing only 250 grams every half hour. The tea-cauldrons are heated electrically to a temperature of about 25oC or 74oF. It takes four pounds of fresh leaves to produce one pound of parched tea.

How Oolong Tea is produced

Manual production method supported by tradition and craftsmanship.
The production of delicious oolong tea requires time-honored tradition and outstanding craftsmanship. Tea leaves are picked on the morning of a clear day. They should be picked in units consisting of one bud and three leaves and exposed to the sun. This is the first stage. The second stage is to dry them indoors to promote fermentation. The most crucial part in the production of oolong tea is when to stop fermentation. As oolong tea is fermented to some extent, it is called semi-fermented tea.

Experience is required to identify the best time to stop the fermentation, which is when the leaves are 30% red and 70% green. After this, they are rubbed repeatedly to generate good flavor, aroma, and texture. Then they are dried using charcoal. At the final stage, a tea master grades the quality according to the flavor and characteristics of each batch. China’s Fujian Chaye Jin Chukou Gongsi (Tea Import and Export Corporation and Fujian Tea Association) exports oolong tea to Japan.

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